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ForFarmers closely involved in studies published in Poultry Science

29-10-2019
Albert Dijkslag

The October edition of Poultry Science, the world’s leading scientific publication for poultry, features two articles about studies which ForFarmers was closely involved with.

Albert Dijkslag, Poultry Nutrition and Innovation Manager, is the lead and co-author of these articles. The publications are about the research conducted into young laying hens’ phosphorus needs and reducing the protein content in broiler feed. These research projects allow us to look into the possibilities on offer for improving phosphor and nitrogen efficiency and reducing emissions, entirely in line with ForFarmers’ sustainability strategy.

What are the publications about?

The publication about phosphate is a collaboration between Wageningen UR and ForFarmers, in order to acquire an insight into young laying hens’ need for phosphorus in their transition from the rearing to the laying phase. The research showed there is plenty of room for improving the phosphorus utilisation, but it’s not yet clear what long-term effect this will have on the birds. This research forms part of a large project in which ForFarmers wants to better understand the laying hens’ phosphorus needs, in order to fine-tune the levels in the feed and to subsequently improve efficiency.

The publication about protein describes a test carried out in the ForFarmers broilers test stable. The aim is to reduce the protein content in the feed for broilers, allowing for the improvement of nitrogen efficiency and a reduction in emissions. This test was carried out within the scope of the Feed4Food programme and the research shows it’s perfectly possible for steps to be taken here, but in practice this doesn’t yet happen, as synthetic amino acids are either very expensive or not fully permitted. The follow-up research will look at the broilers’ exact needs where amino acids are concerned, making sure the results from this research can be translated into practice more effectively.